An open letter to leaders in the Evangelical community

 

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On Friday, December 4, Liberty University’s Chancellor Falwell made public statements about protecting the campus against possible terrorist threats. In his remarks, he called for students to arm themselves so that they could “end those Muslims before they walked in and killed them,” exhorting the students to “teach them a lesson if they ever show up here.” While these sorts of remarks epitomize the ever-growing fear and hostility directed toward Muslims, we as Evangelical Christians hold that Christ calls us not to react with religious oppression or violence—instead, we have the responsibility to live out fearless love in order to pursue unity. We, therefore, reject the ideology espoused by Chancellor Falwell in his recent remarks to the Liberty student body, and we invite you to stand in solidarity with our Muslim brothers and sisters who share our human dignity.

The Danger of Divisive Ideology: When Fear Leads to Religious Discrimination

The Scriptures invoke a call to fearless love; as 1 John 4:18 says, “There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves punishment, and the one who fears is not perfected in love.” In our country and in the Evangelical community, fear has become a driving motivator which has led to stigmatization, acts of aggression, and a push for public policy that targets and alienates the Muslim population. Falwell specifically ostracized those of the Islamic faith through making generalized statements about “those Muslims” with rhetoric that implicitly accused them of enmity and terrorism. Despite his later clarifications—which were only offered after media backlash—a higher standard is expected of leaders in our country and our community, particularly among Christians in leadership. Therefore, such comments detract from the witness of the Gospel and the call to love our neighbors and pursue unity.

The Call to Pursue Unity: Our Responsibility as Christian Leaders

As Christian leaders representing the name of Jesus Christ in our world, we have an opportunity and responsibility to guard our words and to protect the pillars of unity and love of neighbor which the Gospels command us to pursue. Therefore, we desire to stand in solidarity with our Muslim brothers and sisters, supporting the shared principles of justice, well-being and compassion. Because we believe that perfect love drives out fear, we hope for a world in which religious communities object to discrimination, combat religious animosity, and stand for justice.  Even when our neighbors are violent, we are called to love as Christ did, to the point of death, for Matthew 5:43 says, “You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.”

We also exhort leaders in Evangelical communities to be representatives for religious and social change. We firmly stand against the deprecatory comments made against Muslims at Liberty University in the past week, and yet we hope that this instance can bring to light the pressing need for awareness and a regenerated attitude of love.

Right now, there are two roads that we as Evangelical Christians can take. The first is that which prioritizes our own comfort and security, following the reactionary attitudes that stem from divisive fear. This leads to anger and hatred of our neighbor, and to the societal exclusion of those who are not exactly like us. The second road is the one where we actively reject the postures of discrimination and exclusion. Going down this path, we instead follow the voice of Jesus, calling us to love our neighbor and to pursue peace toward those hostile to us or our faith, and to stand in solidarity with our Muslim brothers and sisters.

Sincerely,

A Coalition of Student Leaders of Wheaton College

This letter first appeared in print The Wheaton Record in Issue 15, on Dec. 10. 

39 Responses to An open letter to leaders in the Evangelical community

  1. WAO! stellar article!

  2. a very well-writes and theologically thoughtful response to the climate of fear and “us vs. them” thinking pervading many conversations around interfaith relationships at the moment.

    this makes me very proud to be a Wheaton graduate. blessings to you!

  3. Pingback: Wheaton College students condemn Jerry Falwell remarks - newsofchicago.com

  4. Well done and well said, Wheaties! I’m so proud of you!

  5. God clearly teaches that religions which are not founded on Jesus Christ are false. False religions have as their author, Satan. Satan comes only to steal, kill, and destroy. While all Muslims certainly do not support the actions of their extremist counterparts, we as Christians should not be surprised if any religion other than Christianity ends in theft, murder, and destruction. Likewise, we should not expect those who are not Christians to act like Christians or reflect good. God clearly teaches that the only good comes from him; nobody has seen him except Jesus; in Jesus we can become more like him; Jesus is the only way to true good. What unites man is their “humanity;” however, that humanity is summed up in the concept of sin. “Interfaith dialog,” as a Christian should consist of an evangelical effort to be a witness to every other worldview and defend God’s Truth against attenuation and distortion. Regarding “interfaith dialog:” Sin, from the beginning separated- man from God and man from man. “Tolerance” of something which innately separates and divides (sin) will never produce unity. The fallacy of such logic is axiomatic. All men are divided from God and each other always until and unless the blood of Jesus Christ reconciles that gap. We, evangelicals need to focus on Jesus Christ and him crucified, let God change whom he will, and be prepared to suffer whatever loss or criticism might come our way. Be it physical, emotional, social, or intellectual suffering.

    • Jeremy Neal, thank you for the fundamentalist viewpoint this thoughtful and timely article was so lacking. Truly, we are all stained with sin due to the unfortunate mistaken incident in the Garden ever so long ago in which the talking snake gave the apple to our female ancestor, who then wickedly gave it to her mate, staining humans ever after to be detested by God for being fellow apple partakers, even little babies who crave applesauce. Unlesssss, we make the pact with God’s son, the offspring of His union and seed-planting with the heretofore undeflowered Mary. Jesus, a Middle Eastern Jew who walked amongst mankind and tried to teach them to live together and break bread and have a general love in, and even come up with a universal health care plan if available, until his untimely demise, but then back alive oh Zombie Jesus! We make a pact to assuage for the aforementioned apple-devourers with you in your spatial resurrection and non-brain eating ways. It is important that you, Jeremy Neal, have pointed out that all other un-true, made up, fairy tale religions like Islam should be viewed as Satanic death cults. To quote General William G. Boykin during the Iraq War of W.O.M.D. liberation, “I knew that my God was bigger than his. I knew that my God was a real God and his was an idol.” That was while we were righteously slaughtering over 100,000 of their citizens. Also G.W. Bush (praise his Christian soul!) ‘God told me to end the tyranny in Iraq’ Now never you mind that this led in a direct line to ISIS and our current chaos and insanity when we all just wanted to watch smart bombs on CNN. The important thing is confirming our own righteousness as you have so clearly demonstrated. It is not to understand or broaden or improve humanity’s lot. Just to convince ourselves that the stories we cling to in our own minds, perhaps entirely due to the accidents of birthplace, social happenstance and conditioning, are the only ONE TRUE THING™.

  6. This letter is an outstanding contribution to the discussion. I hope Wheaton students who are Southern Baptist will also ask for a clear word from Russell Moore. Moore has been critical of Donald Trump’s remarks, but has said nothing public about similar words from President Falwell, though Liberty is a Baptist-affiliated university.

  7. Well done. Know that many other Christian college students, staff, and faculty support you. Grace and peace from your North Central brothers and sisters.

  8. I’m very proud of Wheaton students for speaking out against Falwell, and indirectly against Trump. I’ve been shocked and dismayed at the recent display of hatred toward Muslims by Christians. It does not reflect the love of Jesus. You’ve got it right … as Christians we need to love our enemies, if enemies they be. The trouble is that this fear-filled rhetoric about banning Muslims from coming to America makes people out to be “enemies” when we could have and should be making them our friends. We used to consider it part of cross-cultural (or “Missiology”) education, that we were glad that people from other countries and other religions were coming to America so we could evangelize them, or utilize “friendship evangelism.” Now, so many Christians just employ hate. Thank you for putting the love of Jesus first. Please continue in this vein.

  9. Pingback: 5 Reasons why Falwell’s advice is wrong | TALL SKINNY KIWI

  10. I perceive a lot of youthful righteous indignation here. I have not honestly kept up on the context of Falwell’s remarks but, knowing the reputation of the school, I do not really believe they stem from, or are motivated by hate, or even fear, as is recurringly implied here. I have no association with Falwell or Liberty but want to give them, as Christians, the benefit of the doubt. To encourage students to arm themselves to me is a simple defensive expedient aimed at preventing the needless massacre of fellow students or college staff. Rather than a hatred of the perpetrators, I believe such actions should more properly be thought of as reflecting a concern and love for ones neighbors. Does it make more sense, or reflect more love, to allow a terrorist to kill any number of people, or to neutralize the one or few individuals engaged in creating the mayhem?

  11. There is little doubt that most thinking Christians reject the comments of Falwell, assuming they are accurately quoted. Nevertheless, there is a naivete in the Wheaton article that is troubling. It is most certainly not wrong for Christians to oppose evil in all its forms, and there is in the current leadership of Islam a very great deal of evil. There are hundreds of thousands of professors of Islam whose sole interest in “freedom” is the license they desire for themselves to rape and kill. I would urge these Wheaton students to look long and hard at the Middle East, especially at the beheaded Christian children and those children literally crucified by those devoted to Jihad. As Christians we are not to hate, and we are to love and “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live in peace with everyone.” – Romans 12:18 Such Scriptural teaching frequently presents dilemmas and tough choices for Christians. However, in addition to all the teaching of Christ about love, He also said: “Do not suppose that I came to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword.” – Matthew 10:34 As Evangelical Christians failure to oppose the literally worldwide Jihad movement of radical Islam invites a Holocaust that would make Hitler’s Holocaust look like a picnic-in-the-park. It is ill-advised to refer to the devotees of Islam as our “brothers and sisters”. While recognizing there are peaceloving Muslims, the current leaders are the enemies of God devoted to the destriuction of Israel, the institution of Sharia Law, and the eradication of Christianity from the earth. Christians are not in error to oppose evil and fight for freedom and justice. Failure to recognize the threat of Jihad invites worldwide catastrophe to Christians and the entire Free World.

    • Weary of people mis-quoting Matt. 10:34. It is NOT a call to arms; rather it is Jesus’ warning to his disciples that they will face persecution because of Him–and that they must be willing to accept and ENDURE it. Do you not remember when He re-attached the severed ear of the soldier who was arresting Him? They don’t call Him the “Prince of Peace” for nothing! As to Paul’s letter to the Romans–he encourages people to leave revenge to God. He is saying that if you can’t be at peace with others, just leave them alone. It’s not a call for flying bullets.

  12. Herein lies the flaw…the article states, “Therefore, we desire to stand in solidarity with our Muslim brothers and sisters, supporting the shared principles of justice, well-being and compassion.” It is uncertain that we do share the same principles of justice, well-being and compassion. Perhaps a closer look at the teachings of Islam would be in order. Better to have said, “Because of our Christian principles of justice, and Christ’s call to love our enemies, and our compassion for those who do not know Christ as Savior and Lord, we will reach out in love to Muslims, and all others who do not know the grace of God. “

  13. Most thinking Christians reject Falwell’s words, assuming they are quoted accurately. However, there must be a strong recognition that Islam now is controlled by those devoted to Jihad, namely, ISIS/ISIL, Al-Qaeda,Taliban, Hamas, Hezbollah, Boko Haram, Al-Nusra, Abu Sayyaf, Al-Badr, Muslim Brotherhood, Lashkar-e-Taiba, Palestine Liberation Front,
    Ansaru, Jemaah Islamiyah, and Abdullah Azzam Brigades. All of these are devoted to terrorist operations, and the destruction of all freedom except for their own license to rape and kill. As Christians we are committed to lives of love, even of enemies; yet, at the same time we are called upon to oppose evil in all its forms. Jesus spoke often of the necessity of love; yet, He also said, “Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword.” Paul wrote: “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.” Regrettably, with the current Muslim leadership it is not possible, and our Christian duty is to oppose vigorously those bent on nothing but Jihad and the destruction of freedom, the nation of Israel, and Christianity itself. Many Islamic people are most definitely not our “brothers and sisters”. May God give us wisdom to discern the right course of action in an increasingly dangerous world.

    • I am genuinely saddened. This is sad. These students have taken and are trying to espouse the flat out most important LESSON of the bible. Love. It is very difficult to love. It is even more difficult to love when confronted with violence. I agree that a love arrow would not stop a shooter but love would stop creating them. Like all new policies that go into effect there can be some time before the results are seen and felt. But that’s just it, by doing the most difficult thing, the most Christian thing, is the only way we will see meaningful change. It will not be tomorrow or next year but in ten, fifteen and twenty years from today when those touched by the love of Christ or a good Christian will not make choices to harm their fellow man regardless of theological identity. The regurgitated hate speech and blindly rushing to guns in the hands of untrained young adults is an easy path, a quick fix. That kinda sounds like something that would come from the mind of the Devil. On one hand is the difficult and almost impossible to achieve ideal of Christ and on the other hand is a quick and easy fix that does not resemble the first. That sounds like Temptation to me….
      Just some food for thought.
      and P.S. Troll away on this thread. That’s real Christian of you………….

  14. our “Muslim brothers and sisters”? Well, one epic adventure in missing the point deserves another I suppose…

  15. As someone who lives in Lynchburg near the Falwell followers, it is a blessing to my soul to hear Christian collegiates who actually understand and follow the teachings of our Savior. Thank you. Bless you. Merry Christmas!

  16. I am unsure what to make of this letter.

    It has the ring of truth, but in the end seems to dismiss one of the defining points of Evangelical Christianity: namely its evangelical drive, to share the good news of Christ’s redemptive work. This letter expects us to believe that there are only two possible paths for us (elucidated with trite and insufficient desrciptors, no less). On the one hand the path of “hatred,” “exclusion,” “reactionary attitudes,” and “divisive fear.” On the other hand we may choose (the sanctimonious calls of the modern liberal agenda) “inclusion,” “solidarity”, “peace,” “awareness.” No surprises here.

    Let me be very clear in echoing condemnations of violence and discrimination againss Muslims (or anyone). What serious, God-fearing Christian in his right mind would advocate this? It is neither charitable, nor mandated biblically. I agree with this impetus of the letter: let us indeed not give way to hatred! It simply goes against everything Christ taught us. So I am not concerned about condemning the first path proposed to us: indeed I agree with this condemnation.

    I am deeply concerned with the second path, however. While it is coated with layer upon layer of delectable, unctuous concepts like peace, love, and social justice, it stops there. Is that it? Is there a cake under all that sugar?

    There should be.

    There should be something far more substantial.

    There should be the Gospel.

    What purpose does peaceful living serve if not as a means to share the Good News of Christ’s redemptive work? Is this not Evangelicalism? When we say “the love of God” do we not include Christ’s redemptive work on the cross under this heading? For what did Christ die? So that God might accept one’s personal and spiritual status quo as the height of holiness? Do Muslims simply have no need of Christ in their lives? Is their God truly the same as ours?

    Yet this letter would have us embrace the idea that the final end-game is inclusion itself, peaceful co-existence, and compassion. This is at best a half-truth, and at worst a full-blown lie. Truly we must be compassionate! Truly we must be peaceable! Truly we must love! But what kind of love is it, if you withhold the very light you live by? How much do you have to hate someone to hog the Gospel to yourself, not to pray for an end to his bondage to sin and darkness, or show him the way out? Love our neighbor? Does this mean we stop with peaceful co-existence? What good does that go your neighbor, if he dies and spends eternity separated from his Creator?

    But perhaps I’m assuming too much. Perhaps indeed the authors of this letter truly do believe that the Christian and Muslim deities really are the same. Perhaps this is why they use the terms “brother” and “sister” and “solidarity,” or seem to think we have “shared principles of justice, well-being and compassion.” If this is the case, then the authors have strayed far from their supposed roots, in failing to hold to one of the basic premises of Evangelical Chrisitianity, that Jesus Christ is the only way: that he is the Truth and the Life, and that no one comes to the Father but through him. This is in fact a deeply exclusive message: it is for everyone, but it entails change, one which will set you apart from others. The Muslim who comes to Christ understands this far better than the authors of this letter.

    “The Danger of Divisive Ideology”…? What’s sauce for the goose, as they say: the danger of “Inclusive Ideology” is real as well. Fail to place inclusivity in its proper place (whether logically, socially, or spiritually), and you will do far more harm than good. If you have propped up Inclusion in your heart in the place of Christ, I pray you will turn from this. Wheaton was once a bastion for rescuing people, for sharing not only Christ’s “love” but his clear and exclusive offer of salvation and hope.

    There has been a sad trend in recent years: to adopt a nearly adolescent attitude towards matters of social justice and equality, as though such issues could be resolved by a none-or-all approach, and this even by senior members of academia. But a mature Christian person will understand the primacy of loving one’s neighbor as including a communication of the Gospel.

    I see no indication from this letter that its authors care one bit about a Muslim’s eternal fate, or anyone’s eternal fate, or whether they even believe there is such a thing. So while many topical elements of this letter ring loudly with truth, I find the ideology which forms its underpinnings to be utterly insidious.

    This isn’t an issue about whether we should hate Muslims or love them. That’s a red herring, and frankly a non-starter. The central question is rather “Do we love Muslims enough to share the GOSPEL with them, to tell them of the one true God who loves them and wants them to repent of their sins and turn to him?” This is the question we should consider, as “Christian leaders representing the name of Jesus Christ in our world.”

  17. ##### My comment appeared when I first posted it, and then it vanished… so I’m reposting… #####

    I am unsure what to make of this letter.

    It has the ring of truth, but in the end seems to dismiss one of the defining points of Evangelical Christianity: namely its evangelical drive, to share the good news of Christ’s redemptive work. This letter expects us to believe that there are only two possible paths for us (elucidated with trite and insufficient desrciptors, no less). On the one hand the path of “hatred,” “exclusion,” “reactionary attitudes,” and “divisive fear.” On the other hand we may choose (the sanctimonious calls of the modern liberal agenda) “inclusion,” “solidarity”, “peace,” “awareness.” No surprises here.

    Let me be very clear in echoing condemnations of violence and discrimination againts Muslims (or anyone). What serious, God-fearing Christian in his right mind would advocate this? It is neither charitable, nor mandated biblically. I agree with this impetus of the letter: let us indeed not give way to hatred! It simply goes against everything Christ taught us. So I am not concerned about condemning the first path proposed to us: indeed I agree with this condemnation.

    I am deeply concerned with the second path, however. While it is coated with layer upon layer of delectable, unctuous concepts like peace, love, and social justice, it stops there. Is that it? Is there a cake under all that sugar?

    There should be.

    There should be something far greater.

    There should be the Gospel.

    What purpose does peaceful living serve if not as a means to share the Good News of Christ’s redemptive work? Is this not Evangelicalism? When we say “the love of God” do we not include Christ’s redemptive work on the cross under this heading? For what did Christ die, so that God might accept one’s personal and spiritual status quo as the height of holiness? Do Muslims simply have no need of Christ in their lives? Is their God truly the same as ours?

    Surely this is not the case.

    Yet this letter would have us embrace the idea that the final end-game is inclusion itself, peaceful co-existence, and compassion. But this is only a half-truth, at best. Truly we must be compassionate! Truly we must be peaceable! Truly we must love! But what kind of love is it, if you withhold the very light you live by? How much do you have to hate someone not to share the Gospel of the Lord with him, not to pray for an end to his bondage to sin and darkness, or show him the way out? Love our neighbor? Does this mean we stop with peaceful co-existence? What good does that go your neighbor, if he dies and spends eternity separated from his Creator?

    But perhaps I’m assuming too much. Perhaps indeed the authors of this letter truly do believe that the Christian and Muslim deities really are the same. Perhaps this is why they use the terms “brother” and “sister” and “solidarity,” or seem to think we have “shared principles of justice, well-being and compassion.” If this is the case, then the authors have strayed far from their supposed roots, in failing to hold to one of the basic premises of Evangelical Chrisitianity, that Jesus Christ is the only way: that He is the Truth and the Life, and that no one comes to the Father but through him. This is in fact a deeply exclusive message: it is for everyone, but it entails change, one which will set you apart from others. The Muslim who comes to Christ understands this far better than the authors of this letter.

    “The Danger of Divisive Ideology”…? What’s sauce for the goose, as they say: the danger of “Inclusive Ideology” is real as well. Fail to place inclusivity in its proper place (whether logically, socially, or spiritually), and you will do far more harm than good. If you have propped up Inclusion in your heart in the place of Christ, I pray you will turn from this. Wheaton was once a bastion for rescuing people, for sharing not only Christ’s “love” but his clear and exclusive offer of salvation and hope.

    There has been a sad trend in recent years: to adopt a nearly adolescent attitude towards matters of social justice and equality, as though such issues could be resolved by a none-or-all approach, and this even by senior members of academia. But a mature Christian person will understand the primacy of loving one’s neighbor as including a communication of the Gospel.

    I see no indication from this letter that its authors care one bit about a Muslim’s eternal fate, or anyone’s eternal fate, or whether they even believe there is such a thing. So while many topical elements of this letter ring loudly with truth, I find the ideology which forms its underpinnings to be utterly insidious.

  18. Pingback: In Defence of Defence | Cogito, Credo, Petam

  19. I too am concerned about the choice to use the words “brothers and sisters”. Muslims ARE our neighbors. But they are NOT our brothers and sisters in Christ.

    http://blogs.thegospelcoalition.org/kevindeyoung/2015/12/15/thinking-theologically-about-islam/

    • But they are children of God because God created them. Using the words ‘brothers and sisters’ to indicate common humanity has a long history. Applying the Christian meaning of Brothers and sisters (in Christ) seems to be adding something that was not present in the article.

  20. In as much as I agree with your premise [Christians are called to love….], I am sad to see you compromise Biblical truth. On three instances you state “our Muslim brothers and sisters.” How can you Biblically support this? It seems as if you are both calling Muslims enemies and brothers and sisters, which is honestly confusing, misleading, and not Biblical, (It is, however, very culturally appropriate). Perhaps it was an effort to portray the depth of your love for all people, made in the image of God? Jesus definitely teaches this. It is indeed the second greatest commandment he gave his disciples to “love your neighbor as yourself” Mark 12:31. Who is my neighbor, the disciples asked? Jesus responded to this query in Luke 10 by a parable, basically saying that EVERYONE is your neighbor. That is a pretty intense command. Self love is pretty real, and central in the human heart. As believers, we are called to love everyone, as we love ourselves. That is intense love. That is intense dying to self.

    But Jesus himself did not mince words when he speaks of whom he calls family. He does not even identify his family by blood relations! In Matthew 12:48-50 it says, “He replied to him, ‘Who is my mother, and who are my brothers?’ Pointing to his disciples, he said, ‘Here are my mother and my brothers. For whoever does the will of my Father in heaven is my brother and sister and mother.’”

    If I am in Christ, than I am brother and sister with those who are in Christ. Period. Adoption is beautiful, serious, theological, and forever. But also, if I am in Christ, than those who are enemies of Christ are my enemies as well. Jesus definitely prepared His people for this. In John 15: 18 He says, “If the world hates you, know that it has hated me before it hated you’. Unlike the natural human response, the response Christ calls Christians to in regard to ‘enemies’ is not natural. Honestly, it is impossible without God working in our hearts. Matthew 5:44 says “But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.”

    Why do we love? How can we love? What is the Christian’s motivation for love? for brothers and sisters? For ones neighbor? for enemies? We love, because Christ loved us first (1 John 1:19). “But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us (Romans 6:23). Christ died for us when we were His enemies! (Romans 5:10). We love in response to His love. We can only truly love like this, if we have seen the depth of our own enmity with God, and our hearts have been changed by His great love. And if we have truly been overcome by this love and mercy, the greatest act of love we can give, is to share it with others.

    With this in mind, I have a few questions for you:
    How do you think we can best love our Muslim neighbors? Should not eternity play a factor?
    Does it concern you, that you received the approval of the ‘world’ via secular media in the publishing of this article?
    Does it concern you at all, whom you make familial alliances with in your article, and whom you are estranging?
    How do you think you can best love Jerry Jr who is, by profession, your brother in Christ?

    In love,

    Abi

  21. Pingback: Suburban Professor Placed on Leave After Wearing Hijab

  22. This letter is amazing and inspiring. I can’t begin to express how happy and grateful I am to be your neighbor. I love you all for championing the cause of righteousness and peace. May God, the Most-Gracious, bless you and your families.

  23. Pingback: Chicago Christian college suspends professor for wearing headscarf - E News Online

  24. I am very sad because I have thought that Jerry Falwell Jr loves Jesus of Nazareth. However, reading his call and invitation to young and impressionist young Christians to arm themselves with devilish weapons we call guns, made me realize that his picture of Jesus differs from the Prince of Peace. He has in mind a political Jesus and not Peaceful Jesus. No Christian who loves and knows the Prince of Peace will have such a corrupt mind that is different from the Mind of Christ. I am praying for Falwell and those that share fallen characteristic of theology. True Evangelical Christians should resist the evil of false and political evangelicalism that is rooted in American patriotism and Western, deductive theology with no linguistic scripture as the foundation. Brother Falwell Jr, repentance is within your reach, please grab it, because where fear and hatred abound, grace of God and love Christ abound more.

  25. Pingback: Christian College Suspends Hijab-Wearing Professor Over Islam Comments

  26. I’m seeing news reports that numerous mosques have hired armed guards to protect their folks during worship, while others have engaged off-duty police for protection. Homeland Security is said to be working with quite a number of them and there are stepped up police patrols with additional firepower in case of trouble. So this seems to be a common response of all human beings to the threat of violence, not just one peculiar to some Christian churches and leaders. Thoughts? What should we say to them? Is it appropriate?

  27. Pingback: Christian College Suspends Hijab-Wearing Professor Over Islam Comments | Desiforce Entertainment

  28. Pingback: Wheaton College Professor Placed on Leave After Wearing Hijab | Eslkevin's Blog

  29. Pingback: Evangelicals Debate Whether Muslims And Christians Worship The Same God In The Wake Of Wheaton College Controversy – Our Ladies and Gentle Men

  30. Wheaton College President Philip Ryken denies targeting professor for wearing a hijab

    by Lynda Carson ( tenantsrule@yahoo.com )
    Saturday Dec 19th, 2015 3:00 AM

    Click below…

    https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2015/12/19/18781115.php

    >>>>>>>>

  31. Pingback: Christian college to fire professor over Muslim actions | THE ZREPORTER NEWS

  32. Pingback: Christian college to fire professor over Muslim actions -RocketNews

  33. This article is deluded. Muslims are not brothers and sisters. They are apart from Christ. Whereas I agree that Muslims shouldn’t be killed, the correct way to love Muslims is to make them into Christians, not by accepting them as they are and trying to pursue “unity” with them.

  34. ” About this verse (2 Timothy 3:4), William Barclay says in the Daily Bible Study Commentary:

    Love of self is the basic sin, from which all others flow. The moment a man makes his own will the centre of life, divine and human relationships are destroyed, obedience to God and charity to men both become impossible. The essence of Christianity is not the enthronement but the obliteration of self.

    New “religions” calling themselves “Christian” and having self-love as their very essence are popping up everywhere. These churches are quite popular, and their congregations tend to be large. In them, tolerance is a key concept, and the facts about the vileness of sin and man’s vital need of repentance are smoothed over. Additionally, they will not teach several true Christian doctrines, ones essential to salvation, because of their belief that they are “divisive.”

    Truly, those doctrines do divide! They divide Christians away from the world yet unite them with God. These new religious groups are ignoring essential doctrines for the sake of so-called UNITY. Which is more important: unity with God or men? ”

    This was a comment about the student leaders’ article about unity with the Muslims.

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